About the Journal

Minidoka Project, Idaho 1918. Photo from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, of the U.S. Department of the Interior

Minidoka Project, Idaho 1918. Photo from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, of the U.S. Department of the Interior

 

How might interdisciplinary practices promote a reconsideration of the role that humanity plays in a more-than-human world?
 

In a strongly fragmented and disciplined-based world, Mapping Meaning, the Journal, provides a space for scientists, scholars and artists to experiment with divergent approaches in the face of radical global change and ecological and social crises.

Recalling the 1918 photograph depicting an all-female survey crew, which inspired Mapping Meaning, we recognize those who have come before us yet remain unnamed, unknown. For this reason, Mapping Meaning, the Journal, looks to support, promote, and advance the creative work and scholarship of unrecognized and underrepresented voices, which we define in the broadest extent possible by recognizing the complexity of intersectionality.

The project takes a holistic approach toward the “surveying” of human, ecological and technological landscapes, and ardently resists oversimplification. We are specifically looking for work that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries because it is often at the margins and ecotones where the greatest diversity occurs, creating the potential to revitalize dialogue and foster alternative narratives and encounters. 

The Honors College at the University of Utah serves as Mapping Meaning Journal’s partner and fiscal sponsor.