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    This exhibition draws from the work of artists, scientists and scholars who first met while attending five-day experimental workshops in 2010 and 2012.   Similar to the workshops, this exhibition takes an experimental approach bringing together an interdisciplinary group from around the United States and Canada to push against traditional boundaries. Taking divergent approaches these artists examine the complexities of how we engage our environments and the resulting social, political and ecological implications of how one constructs meaning.  Leading up to the exhibition, a series of mini-workshops took place at Lafayette College focused on the topic of “ecotone.” During the workshops undergraduate students worked alongside Mapping Meaning artists and scholars to explore current transitions in climate and technology and create site-specific work that is included in this exhibition.      Participating Artists:    Karina Aguilera Skvirsky   Nat Castañeda  Vasia Markides    
  
 
  
    
  
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  Krista Caballero     
  
 
  
    
  
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  Trudi Lynn Smith   Carmina Sánchez-del-Valle  THINK AGAIN (S.A. Bachman + David John Attyah)    
  
 
  
    
  
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  Linda Wiener       Student Participants:   Genevieve M. Asselin  Andrea Coles  Elisabeth Day  L'Eunice Faust  Julia L. Guarch  Briana Howard  Ariel Jakubowski  Deborah M. List  Allison K. O'Donnell  Oluwadamilare Oyefeso  Nicole Pettingill  Megan M. Richardson  Jill Rosker  Aaliyah B. Shodeinde     Guest curator: Krista Caballero, Associate Director, Digital Cultures and Creativity, Honors College, University of Maryland and Mapping Meaning Founder.

This exhibition draws from the work of artists, scientists and scholars who first met while attending five-day experimental workshops in 2010 and 2012. 

Similar to the workshops, this exhibition takes an experimental approach bringing together an interdisciplinary group from around the United States and Canada to push against traditional boundaries. Taking divergent approaches these artists examine the complexities of how we engage our environments and the resulting social, political and ecological implications of how one constructs meaning.

Leading up to the exhibition, a series of mini-workshops took place at Lafayette College focused on the topic of “ecotone.” During the workshops undergraduate students worked alongside Mapping Meaning artists and scholars to explore current transitions in climate and technology and create site-specific work that is included in this exhibition.

 

Participating Artists:

Karina Aguilera Skvirsky

Nat Castañeda

Vasia Markides

Krista Caballero

Trudi Lynn Smith

Carmina Sánchez-del-Valle

THINK AGAIN (S.A. Bachman + David John Attyah)

Linda Wiener

 

Student Participants:

Genevieve M. Asselin

Andrea Coles

Elisabeth Day

L'Eunice Faust

Julia L. Guarch

Briana Howard

Ariel Jakubowski

Deborah M. List

Allison K. O'Donnell

Oluwadamilare Oyefeso

Nicole Pettingill

Megan M. Richardson

Jill Rosker

Aaliyah B. Shodeinde

 

Guest curator: Krista Caballero, Associate Director, Digital Cultures and Creativity, Honors College, University of Maryland and Mapping Meaning Founder.

03_Survival-101_Sculpture.jpg
Krista Caballero

Krista Caballero

Survival 101 (sculptural edition)

2010-2013

Survival 101 re-imagines leveling rods from a 1918 photograph depicting an all-female survey crew. Hand-carved historic designs are integrated with barcode references and video performance playing with notions of obsolete and emerging technologies.

Krista Caballero

Krista Caballero

Survival 101 (detail)    

The video includes performances where participants were introduced to basic signaling techniques as well as emergency Morse code. Necessities for any survival kit, mirrors are carried for both military and civilian use while in wilderness environments. In an emergency situation flashes of sunlight signal distress and have the ability to communicate across great distance. Depending upon weather conditions these flashes can be visible up to 50 miles away with the record rescue being 105 miles.

Video Performance with participants at Mapping Meaning, Lafayette College, Easton, PA (2013)  

Karina Aguilera Skvirsky

Karina Aguilera Skvirsky

Time Travels, Miseria

Capital Reef, Utah (2012)

Easton, PA (2013)

Performance

9 minutes

 

"A time traveler, nostalgic for a pre-apocalyptic present, lands in UTAH. Rather than tell tales from the future, this bipedal, hermaphroditic life form reminisces by singing a song/bolero—“Miseria”—by Los Panchos (1949). “Miseria” was peformed in Spanish, while subtitles and abstract landscapes rolled across the embedded screen in the time traveler’s chest. Rather than try to represent the unimaginable I donned a second-skin like costume evocative of low budget science fiction films from the past. I performed the Bolero three times singing the song with a different emotional projection—anger, sadness and fear—in a row."

Karina Aguilera Skvirsky

Karina Aguilera Skvirsky

Time Travels, Miseria

Easton, PA (2013)

Performance (detail) 

 

install5.jpg
Carmina Sánchez-del-Valle

Carmina Sánchez-del-Valle

Infinite Terrain: Shared Space (Series)

2013

Workshop with Lafayette College students. Individual and collaborative discovery and marking of places and spaces along the Karl Stirner Arts Trail in Easton, PA. The site is undergoing ecological remediation.

 Emily Markides  Vasia Markides  Carmina Sánchez-del-Valle  Nat Castañeda

Emily Markides

Vasia Markides

Carmina Sánchez-del-Valle

Nat Castañeda

Nat Castañeda

Nat Castañeda

Static Background Radiation (Episodes 1 + Outdoor Interlude)

2013-2014

Video

Episode 1: 5:15

Outdoor Interlude: 2:16

Trudi Lynn Smith

Trudi Lynn Smith

Portable Camera Obscura

2009-2014

Portable Camera Obscura is a walk-in, room-sized camera. The tent structure is a lightproof environment that projects an image of the outside view onto the back wall of the tent with a simple lens. First positioned in the exact location of popular photographic views in Waterton Lakes National Park, Canada in summer 2009, participants enter the tent to see the landscape projected onto the wall of the structure. The work is also about guiding participants on epic journeys: the camera is a portable structure, for hauling on expedition style journeys into the backcountry of parks and protected areas. 

Trudi Lynn Smith

Trudi Lynn Smith

Photo: Steve Gamler

install4.jpg
Linda Wiener

Linda Wiener

Life on Juniper

2014     

Artist/Naturalist Book

Linda Wiener

Linda Wiener

Life on Juniper (detail) 

2014     

Artist/Naturalist Book

 THINK AGAIN (S.A. Bachman + David John Attyah)                Hello/Hola            First edition 2002, 2nd edition 2012  Offset  Postcard campaign and installation        Vasia Markides  Hidden in the Sand  2008  Experimental Documentary  32:24

THINK AGAIN (S.A. Bachman + David John Attyah)              

Hello/Hola          

First edition 2002, 2nd edition 2012

Offset

Postcard campaign and installation

 

Vasia Markides

Hidden in the Sand

2008

Experimental Documentary

32:24

THINK AGAIN (S.A. Bachman + David John Attyah)

THINK AGAIN (S.A. Bachman + David John Attyah)

Hello/Hola          

First edition 2002, 2nd edition 2012

Offset

Postcard campaign and installation

 

Hello/Hola links the rape and murder of over 370 unidentified women in Ciudad Juarez (and Chihuahua) to the structural effects of NAFTA and intergovernmental relations between the USA and Mexico. It connects the flow of international capital and multinational corporations search for cheap labor to the flow of women’s lives.

Many of the victims in Ciudad Juarez were maquiladora (factory) employees and many remain unidentified. Hello/Hola acknowledges the lost identities of these women. It uses the recurring blank nametag, manufactured by Avery, one of the maquiladoras operating in Juarez. The color blue references the factory worker’s uniforms, as well as “black and blue” bruises.

More than half of the murders in Juarez were prompted by motives of domestic violence, robbery and gang wars, while a more than a third involved sexual assault. Gender-based violence is the most crucial public health crisis for women across the globe. Women are more likely to be injured or die from male violence than from cancer, accidents, and war combined. 

In 2010, the United Nations created UN Women, the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women. This was a historic step in accelerating the organization’s goals on gender equality and the empowerment of women.

PLEASE SEND A PRE-ADDRESSED POSTCARD TO UN WOMEN AND VOICE YOUR SUPPORT FOR THE EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN.

install3.jpg
Vasia Markides

Vasia Markides

Hidden in the Sand

2008

Experimental Documentary (video still)

32:24 

In 1974, a coup backed by the Greek military junta instigated Turkey to invade the nation of Cyprus. They captured almost 40% of the island and displaced its residents, both Greek- and Turkish-Cypriot.

Varosha, which was once a tourist district in the city of Famagusta on the east coast of Cyprus, was occupied and all its Greek-Cypriot residents fled their homes. Since then, Varosha has been encircled by barbed wire and kept under strict surveillance by the Turkish military, which uses the territory as a bargaining chip in negotiations with the Cyprus government. Its citizens are still forbidden to return. Over the last 39 years, Varosha went from being "Cyprus's Riviera", to a dilapidated ghost city; its former inhabitants watch their houses decay from outside the barricades.  Within Varosha's limits rare sea turtles nest on the beaches, bougainvilleas overtake deteriorating homes, and wild asparagus and prickly pear plants run rampant.

As both the maker and a participant, the filmmaker examines the fate of this city in captivity and her family's connection to it.

A follow-up to Hidden in the Sand is the documentary, The Famagusta Ecocity Project (currently in production), about a rapidly growing movement in Cyprus to transform Famagusta into Europe's model Ecocity and center for conflict mediation (more at www.ecocityproject.com).